A dietitian stands in portrait

Introducing… a home parenteral nutrition dietitian

Suzanne Hansen is a registered dietitian who divides her time between the home parenteral nutrition program (HPN), various gastroenterology clinics and the adult cystic fibrosis clinic at Hamilton Health Sciences’ (HHS) McMaster University Medical Centre. She has been with HHS for 27 years.

The HPN program accepts a certain number of patients from across the region each year. It sets people up to live at home with intravenous (IV) feeding, or what’s called total parenteral nutrition.

What does a HPN dietitian do?

In the HPN program, we care for up to 30 patients with intestinal failure. They have issues resulting from short bowel syndrome or bowel obstructions secondary to an underlying cancer.

Managing patients in this program is a bit like looking after a ward in the community. We teach patients and families how to start and stop the IV nutrition safely. We closely monitor their clinical status, central line status and response to total parenteral nutrition.

The HPN program sets people up to live at home with IV feeding, or what’s called total parenteral nutrition.

It’s our job to make sure we liaise with other care providers on a regular basis regarding necessary adjustments to a patient’s care plan. We also determine whether they need to continue with this program.

For the other half of my role, I manage patients with a wide range of digestive disorders that interfere with their ability to eat and drink, including Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

What do you love most about your job?

I work in a number of different clinics. When patients tell me a particular nutrition care plan has improved their overall quality of life, it is very gratifying.

HPN patients are often with us for several months or years. In the beginning, they are usually malnourished. When I see them gain weight and become physically and mentally stronger, it warms my heart. Some of them cry tears of joy over their progress.

These interactions and the relationships I develop with my patients and colleagues makes me enjoy coming to work.

HPN patients are often with us for several months or years.

What keeps you motivated at work?

Working with a devoted team of doctors and nurses keeps me motivated. They trust and support my abilities and allow me a certain amount of autonomy. We are all dedicated to delivering quality care to our patients.

Who inspires you?

I have always been inspired by my mother.

My father passed away when I was young and my mother was left to raise seven children. Despite limited finances, she encouraged all of us to pursue our career choices.

My mother was a hard worker and a great cook, and I like to believe this inherent love of food helped guide me to become a dietitian.




portrait of a 93-year-old volunteer

Introducing… a 93-year-old volunteer

Madeline Cook has been a volunteer at Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) for over 20 years and has contributed over 3,600 hours of her time. Despite being visually impaired, she makes her way to St. Peter’s Hospital on a monthly basis. She plays piano for an interactive sing-along as part of the therapeutic programming for patients. Madeline recently celebrated her ninety-third birthday!

Madeline playing piano for the patients at St. Peter's Hospital

What do you do?

Over 20 years ago, a friend of mine had wanted to start volunteering at Hamilton Health Sciences and asked if I wanted to join her. We were looking for something to do where we could help people. When we went into the volunteering office, I was asked about my interests. I talked about how I love music. Ever since then I’ve been playing the piano in the hospital. I started at McMaster Children’s Hospital, but since the patients were so young and unfamiliar with the songs I was playing, I switched St. Peter’s Hospital.

I love knowing I can make an impact in people’s lives.

What do you love most about your role?

I love playing at St. Peter’s Hospital because the patients know the songs and can sing along. Although all music is therapeutic, it has a greater impact when you’re familiar with what you’re listening to. I love knowing I can make an impact in people’s lives. As long as one person is enjoying listening to me play or I’ve been able to make someone smile, it’s worthwhile.

Madeline playing piano as part of the therapeutic recreation programming for patients

Tell us about a gratifying experience at HHS.

A patient that I often see seemed particularly down one day so I told her how much I liked her hat that she’d worn the last time I saw her. When she left, I was worried I may have upset her, but next thing I knew she was back with her hat on and a big smile on her face. That was the first time I ever saw her smile and I’m so glad I could help make it happen. Those moments are what make volunteering so rewarding.

What keeps you motivated?

Music keeps me motivated. I sing in a choir and we meet and perform regularly. We are by no means professional singers, but we love what we do. I guess you could also say we motivate and inspire each other too. We not only love to sing, but we love to make people happy with music.




A nutrition associate stands in portrait

Introducing… a nutrition associate

Sheri Schuur is a nutrition associate based at Hamilton Health Sciences’ (HHS) McMaster University Medical Centre (MUMC). She has been with HHS for close to 30 years including stints as an environmental aide in various units at MUMC.

What do you do?

I mostly work in the maternal feeding room at MUMC, where I prepare formula for babies born at our hospital. I work closely with my fellow nutrition associates, supervisors, dietitians and dietetic assistants.

A nutrition associate pours infant formula into individual bottles.

The room undergoes strict sterilization procedures to ensure every feed is prepared in the safest way possible. It has a special fume hood that only allows my arms to reach within to measure, weigh and mix about 28 feeds per day.

Tell us about your first day at HHS.

I was almost 19 when I started working in nutrition services at MUMC. Right away, I worked with a bunch of great people, which definitely helped me in those early days.

On my first day, I recall how young I was and remember how excited I was to work in a hospital.

What do you love most about your job?

I love working in health care. Before I became a nutrition associate, I used to work in the emergency department as an environmental aide. I loved being in a fast-paced role with such great people. Now, I enjoy the fact I provide nutrition to our newborn patients in a safe place.

Our doctors, nurses and environmental aides are also an important part of what I do. They keep me coming back every day.

I measure, weigh and mix about 28 feeds per day.

Who inspires you?

Early in my career, I ventured over to an environmental aide position working mostly with elderly patients. I was inspired by a former health care aide that worked with me. She was always so happy around patients and loved what she did as a health care professional.

If you were in a bad mood, you wouldn’t be for much longer after spending a few moments with her.

 

Is there a staff member, physician or volunteer you want to recognize for their outstanding work? Send an email to share@hhsc.ca with their name, role, site, department and why they should be recognized. We may feature them in our weekly series.




Portrait of Davis Dos Santos, a chiropractic specialist

Introducing… a chiropractic specialist

David Dos Santos is a chiropractic specialist and the practice lead for the Musculoskeletal Central Intake and Assessment Centre for patients with lower back pain. He joined the complex care and orthopedics program at Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) in October and is based at Hamilton General Hospital.

Before joining HHS, David worked at a regional health care provider where he examined patients about to undergo back surgery. He assessed and treated conditions related to nerves, muscles and the skeleton.

What does a chiropractic specialist do?

Patients with lower back issues see me and my team after they are referred by their family doctors. If it looks like a patient may need surgery, I evaluate them and work with our spine and neurosurgeons to screen for potential issues that could come up during surgery.

I also provide solutions for helping patients manage their pain and improve their mobility.

The most appealing part of my job is to work within a shared-care model of patient care.

What do you love most about your job?

The most appealing part of my job is to work within a shared-care model of patient care. I enjoy partnering with community-based practitioners and primary care providers to offer this model throughout a patient’s journey, which may take them to meeting a spine specialist or their preferred surgeon for a potential operation.

What surprised you the most when you first started working at HHS?

What surprised me the most was the high level of organization at HHS, and the smooth on-boarding process. I am impressed with the level of competence with the management team and their ability to make new employees feel valued.

My goals are to make this new program one of excellence that creates a high level of confidence and satisfaction with patients.

Why do you choose to work at HHS?

I worked with surgical professionals in the past and was impressed by the leadership that was demonstrated. I also wanted to work in a hospital with a high quality university affiliation, which is the case with McMaster University.

What do you hope to accomplish while at HHS?

My goals are to make this new program one of excellence that creates a high level of confidence and satisfaction with patients, primary care providers and surgeons.

I hope to advance the reputation of HHS as a health care facility providing exceptional patient care.

 

Is there a staff member, physician or volunteer you want to recognize for their outstanding work? Send an email to share@hhsc.ca with their name, role, site, department and why they should be recognized. We may feature them in our weekly series.




Portrait of Dr. Katherine Morrison

Introducing… a pediatric endocrinologist

Dr. Katherine Morrison is a pediatric endocrinologist in the Children’s Exercise and Nutrition Centre at McMaster Children’s Hospital. Within this centre, she is the medical director of two clinics, the Growing Healthy Weight Management program and the Pediatric Lipid clinic. She has been at McMaster Children’s Hospital for 18 years.

As a pediatric endocrinologist, what do you do?

As a physician and clinician-researcher, I have the opportunity to do a number of jobs! In the Growing Healthy Weight Management program I help families of children who are overweight and in the Pediatric Lipid clinic I work with families with abnormalities in cholesterol, many of which are genetic. I also conduct research that is closely related to my clinical work and work with trainees in pediatric clinical training and in research.

research was something I wanted to incorporate into my clinical work

What do you love most about your job?

There are many things I love about the work I do, so it’s hard to choose. I am very privileged to have a position where I can care for families, work with an amazing team, have the joy of interacting with clinical and research trainees and have the opportunity to research unanswered questions that I come across in my clinic. But, what I think I would say I love the most about my job is interacting with the wonderful people that I work with.

What made you enter your field of work?

I knew I wanted to be a pediatrician since I was in high school. When I studied Biochemistry at McMaster University as an undergraduate student, it became clear that pediatric endocrinology was my target career direction. In my fellowship, I decided that research was something I wanted to incorporate into my clinical work to try to help more children than just my own patients. It was also during my training that I became interested in understanding the pathways that lead to how we use energy and consume nutrients, as well as how the body handles sugar and fats. I have incorporated this in my clinic and in my research!

My vision is that my research will help us better understand why some children have challenges with energy balance which result in health problems and to develop better treatment programs.

What do you hope to accomplish while at Hamilton Health Sciences?

My first priority is to do everything I can to help the families who come to our clinic. However, I also want to help children with similar problems elsewhere. I hope to accomplish both by continuing to grow and develop with the amazing team of professionals in the Children’s Exercise and Nutrition Centre and through my research. My vision is that the research I do with others at the Centre for Metabolism, Obesity and Diabetes Research will: help us better understand why some children have challenges with energy balance which result in health problems and to develop better treatment programs.




A cardiac registered nurse first assistant stands in portrait.

Introducing… a cardiac registered nurse first assistant

Faye Browne is a cardiac registered nurse first assistant (RNFA) in perioperative services at Hamilton General Hospital. She works in the hospital’s cardiac surgery operating rooms and has been with Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) for over 34 years.

Faye received the Margaret R. Charters Nursing Bursary in 2012. She is also a member of the Golden Key International Honor Society, Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society and the Registered Nurse First Assistant Network of Canada.

What does an RNFA do?

During an operation, I use a technical skill set to assist our cardiac surgeons with handling tissue, using surgical instruments, suturing and knot tying, providing hemostasis (the act of preventing excessive blood loss) and harvesting conduit to create a new blood flow connection across the heart.

On a typical day, I also handle preoperative physical assessments and plan for selective cardiac surgical patients. The cardiac surgery team has many roles within it. We collaborate in the post-operation phase to evaluate selected patients and their outcomes of perioperative nursing care. This includes, for example, positioning, wound healing, surveillance of surgical site infections and bleeding.

I also teach surgical techniques to medical and nursing students as well as residents.

I enjoy being part of a surgical team that has a significant impact on a patient’s well-being through altering and increasing life expectancy.

What do you love most about your job?

I am proud and privileged to work at HHS in one of the RNFA roles. I enjoy being part of a surgical team that has a significant impact on a patient’s well-being through altering and increasing life expectancy.

Our team is dedicated, efficient, effective and financially responsible. We’re committed to our program, the cardiac patient population, research and innovation now and beyond. I like paying it forward to the benefit of others.

What made you enter your field of work?

So many reasons to choose from. I’m fascinated with the amount of leading edge technology, continuous education, problem solving, innovation and constant change in this area.

I also wanted to advance nursing practice. In the 1980s, the RNFA role was identified as one to advance perioperative nurses practice. I knew then this would be my long-term goal because at that time the RNFA role was just being developed in Canada.

This is a technically challenging skill of artistry that takes time to learn.

After completing my registered nurse first assistant certification in addition to a Master’s of Science in Nursing and Education, my dream became a reality thanks to HHS and our cardiac surgeons.

I practice a unique role providing leadership, excellence in perioperative nursing care for the cardiac surgical patient and family through the components of expert clinical practice, consultation, specialized education and leadership. I feel I am an ambassador and assistant to all of my professional colleagues.

What’s one thing people would be surprised to learn about your role?

One aspect of the cardiac RNFA role is to harvest vein, which is used as the conduits for the coronary artery bypasses.

This is a technically challenging skill of artistry that takes time to learn. People are both surprised and impressed by this aspect of my role. The general comment is “how cool is that!”

 

Is there a staff member, physician or volunteer you want to recognize for their outstanding work? Send an email to share@hhsc.ca with their name, role, site, department and why they should be recognized. We may feature them in our weekly series.




An ICU nurse stands in portrait.

Introducing… an ICU nurse

Rachel Thibault is a registered nurse based in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Hamilton Health Sciences’ (HHS) West Lincoln Memorial Hospital (WLMH). She has been with HHS for 21 years including stints as a nurse in the emergency departments at WLMH and McMaster University Medical Centre.

She recently won a WLMH Quality Award for customer service focus.

What does an ICU nurse do?

We care for a wide range of health issues among our adult patients. Our team of nurses works in conjunction with a doctor of internal medicine as well as the patient’s family doctor.

The community model of care we have at WLMH provides patients with an integrated system that allows the family doctor to be responsible for their patient’s care throughout their time in the hospital. Our patients are often our neighbours and we share a common bond of loving our community.

I stay motivated by the fact that every shift is different. As nurses, we are versatile.

What keeps you motivated at work?

I think I stay motivated by the fact that every shift is different and I, along with my colleagues, can be called upon to do various tasks to ensure we’re providing the best care. We are versatile, as nurses, and use a variety of skills to get the job done.

Sometimes we lend a hand to other units who may need help with IV initiations and respiratory care. Being part of HHS has allowed our staff to have greater access to resources that help us do our job.

Who inspires you?

The umbrella driving force in my nursing career is that I honour God in my practice. This includes treating others better than myself. These convictions are with me when I am at work and at home.

I am most inspired by my husband, Daniel, and my family. We have eight children, all of whom were born at WLMH. Each birth experience was amazing with five of them delivered by our family doctor and three by midwives. It was a little strange to be a patient at the hospital where I work but it only made me love this place even more.

Now, one of our daughters is thinking about pursuing a career in nursing. What an encouragement!

Some of my most memorable moments have been at the bedside with patients during their last moments.

Tell us about your most gratifying experience at HHS.

One of the greatest privileges as a nurse in our ICU is helping patients in their time of need.

We have several patients who are in great pain or are near the end-of-life stage. Some of my most memorable moments have been at the bedside with patients during their last moments. I am supported by a great team and look forward to working here for many years at this great hospital.




A prosthetics and orthotics hospital volunteer stands in portrait.

Introducing… a prosthetics and orthotics program volunteer

Penny Cormier is a hospital volunteer with Hamilton Health Sciences’ (HHS) prosthetics and orthotics program. She has been with HHS since 2007.

Penny is also a convener for our volunteer knitting program and she volunteers for the Design Centre at Ron Joyce Children’s Health Centre.

What do you do?

I speak with as many prosthetics and orthotics patients and families as possible to see if they’d be willing to complete a patient experience survey. The data collected from these surveys provides improvement opportunities for the department so they can better meet patients’ needs. I also collect patient experience data at St. Peter’s Hospital.

Patient feedback is important. I also encourage and mentor others in this volunteer role.

The data collected from these surveys provides improvement opportunities for the department so they can better meet patients’ needs.

In addition, I am one of four knitting program conveners. We work with over 50 volunteers who knit and crochet items for sale at our Give Shops. The profits from this program are donated to enhance patient care. I also assist the Design Centre team, which creates individualized visual learning aids for young children.

Who inspires you?

A former patient in the prosthetics and orthotics program, who was also my colleague and friend, Joyce, inspires me the most. As a way to thank the doctors and staff for their dedication, care and support, she enthusiastically signed up to be a volunteer.

Joyce encouraged me to volunteer as well. I quickly understood the volunteer role allowed us to connect even more meaningfully with the wonderfully caring doctors, managers and staff. They continually excel professionally and personally in their interactions with each other, volunteers, and patients and their families.

Joyce was recognized by HHS for the amazing work she did to create volunteer roles, which included providing introductory tours and demonstrations for other rehabilitation patients.

There are also many other volunteers and staff on the volunteer resources team who inspire me. Their efforts and achievements significantly enhance the patient and family experience.

Volunteering gives me unique and rewarding experiences.

What keeps you motivated?

The people who inspire me are the people who keep me motivated. I am also motivated by my interactions with HHS staff, patients, families and visitors.

My work with patient experience surveys provides patients with an opportunity to be heard and to have their feelings, opinions and experiences validated. It is just as important for those who deliver care to receive and respond to all degrees of feedback. Assessment, evaluation, reflection and review of current and future organizational goals and plans are critical in achieving success.

Volunteering gives me unique and rewarding experiences.

Tell us your most gratifying experience.

My ability to connect patients and families with the prosthetics and orthotics team is my most gratifying experience.

I encourage patients, if they so desire, to include additional comments when completing the survey. They appreciate that we share their comments with staff as part of the decision-making process to make the patient and family experience better, including how to improve the registration process.

My most gratifying moments are times spent with patients and staff. It’s good to see the work I do with surveys will have a positive and meaningful impact on department programming across HHS.




A clinical and health psychologist stands in portrait.

Introducing… a clinical and health psychologist

Dr. Kim Edwards is a clinical and health psychologist in the pediatric chronic pain program at Hamilton Health Sciences’ (HHS) McMaster Children’s Hospital.

Kim has been with HHS for over three years, helping to develop the organization’s first pediatric chronic pain program. The team has seen close to 400 new patients and families since the program started in 2015.

She also volunteers for the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Halton and Hamilton.

What does a clinical and health psychologist do?

I work on a wonderful team whose goal is to help children and adolescents with chronic pain. We also help caregivers learn effective strategies to better manage those patients with pain independently and improve their daily functions, such as going to school more regularly.

I identify and treat psychological factors that contribute to the maintenance and exacerbation of pain.

As a clinical and health psychologist, I am interested in the intersection of health and behaviour. More specifically, I identify and treat psychological factors that contribute to the maintenance and exacerbation of pain while also addressing emotional distress that can develop as a consequence of pain. This includes patients who may undergo bouts of depression.

When I work with young people, my first goal is to ensure my patients know I believe their pain is real. I then work with them to understand the effects of their pain on their lives and their treatment goals. Educating them about pain and discussing the impact of lifestyle factors on pain are also important components.

I can help young people accept their current situation, teach some relaxation strategies and empower them to advocate for their needs.

What are you most proud of since you started working at HHS?

One of my proudest initiatives was helping to develop a successful five-week evidence-based caregiver group that we have run, concurrent with a youth group, over 10 times since the clinic began. We are currently evaluating the group through a research project and hope to share the program with other pediatric chronic pain clinics across Canada.

What keeps you motivated at work?

In addition to the patients we serve and the joy experienced from helping them achieve their goals, I enjoy working on a dynamic, supportive, passionate and creative team comprised of leaders in the field of pediatric chronic pain. We have no shortage of team potlucks, birthday celebrations, humorous hallway conversations and daily laughter.

I love giving young people with chronic pain and their families hope that they can get their lives back.

What do you love most about your job?

One of my first families remarked after their initial assessment that their daughter couldn’t wait to go out for ice cream. The mother asked her why and the daughter said, “Because we finally found doctors who believe that my pain is real and who can help me get better.”

This story sums up what I love most about my job: giving young people with chronic pain and their families hope that they can get their lives back. It’s about supporting them in their journey and observing examples of their strength and resilience every day.

Who inspires you?

My mother inspires me. She became deaf at four years old and learned to lip-read so she could remain immersed in her hearing community.

She once used her lip-reading abilities to assist the police and patients with a tracheotomy. My mom also showed me the meaning of being an advocate and inspired my career choice to help youth overcome their challenges to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives.




A medical physicist stands in portrait.

Introducing… a medical physicist

Janos Juhasz is a medical physicist based at Hamilton Health Sciences’ (HHS) Juravinski Cancer Centre (JCC). He has been with HHS since 2009.

Janos is also an assistant professor in the Department of Physics at McMaster University.

What does a medical physicist do?

Within the realm of radiation therapy, I measure radiation, determine the delivered dosage, establish protocols to ensure accuracy, and work with radiation oncologists and radiation therapists to design treatment plans.

I am the designated medical physicist for the breast disease site and hematology disease site teams. I also look after radiation technology at JCC, which includes upgrading technology, offering daily support for radiation treatments, and setting up quality control tests of devices used for radiation treatments.

We always try to implement new technologies for advancing patient care at HHS.

What do you love most about your job?

I love that I can contribute and refine some of our radiation therapy techniques. We always try to implement new technologies for advancing patient care at HHS.

This is a different environment from the academic world. In that space, a physicist has the luxury of saying, “Let me go back to my office or laboratory and I will get back to you with an answer soon.” Oftentimes in the hospital setting, the person receiving care is on the treatment bed and problem-solving must be done more efficiently.

I also work with a dynamic team of professionals, which makes it easy to come into work every day.

Who inspires you?

My all-time inspiration is Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist. He was an outside-the-box thinker and an extremely popular physics teacher. He successfully explained the laws of nature without the need to come up with a strict definition or offer mathematical equations.

I also draw my inspiration from personal development, something I endeavour to do every day. This includes referring to material that motivate and inspire me to stay on purpose with my professional, personal and spiritual self. Bios and stories about famous scientists are my favourite.

Medical physics is where physics comes to life and actually has the potential to prolong life.

What made you enter your field of work?

During my graduate studies, I enrolled in a course called Radiation Therapy Physics. The lectures were held at the local cancer centre.

While I walked through the hospital on my way to the lecture theatre, I had my quantum moment. For the first time in my life, I was just so sure this is it; this is what I want to do for the rest of my life: medical physics.

It is where physics comes to life and actually has the potential to prolong life. The journey from there to here was quite long, but I enjoyed every minute of it.

What do you hope to accomplish while at HHS?

What I set to accomplish in my career is to represent the field of physics with a cheerful human face everywhere I work: the hospital hallways, in the treatment rooms, in offices and in lecture theatres.




A spiritual care practitioner stands in portrait.

Introducing… a spiritual care practitioner

Danielle Slump is a spiritual care practitioner at Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) working primarily at Hamilton General Hospital. She has been with HHS for one year.

What do you do?

I provide spiritually integrated psychotherapy to our patients, families and staff. This could mean helping someone through a life-altering illness as they try to find meaning and purpose in life. I can also offer a ritual or prayer at the end of life stage, and sometimes I support staff through moral distress.

Why do you choose to work at HHS?

I have lived in Hamilton since university and have fallen in love with this city. I feel privileged to work in the community I live, supporting individuals and families going through some of the darkest times in their life.

I listen to stories from patients and families about illness, hospitalization and hope.

Who inspires you?

My colleagues inspire me the most. I regularly see staff gently explain to patients and families, in plain language, about what is happening to them.

I often see how they respond to the complex medical needs of patients, while juggling other pressures that arise.

Part of what I do is listen to stories from patients and families about illness, hospitalization and hope. It’s incredible to hear about the ways that we, as a hospital community, not only care for the physical needs of our patients but their emotional, psychological and spiritual needs as well.

I feel honoured to work alongside such compassionate people.

I have lived in Hamilton since university and have fallen in love with this city.

What’s one thing people would be surprised to learn about your role?

It may surprise some people that though our department is quite small, we have staff at every HHS site and we provide on-call emergency spiritual support.

As spiritual care practitioners or chaplains, we are not only certified through the Canadian Association of Spiritual Care but are also registered psychotherapists through the College of Registered Psychotherapists in Ontario.




A nurse navigator stands in portrait.

Introducing… a registered nurse navigator

Annette Bullen is a registered nurse navigator in the women’s clinic at McMaster University Medical Centre. With 30 years experience at Hamilton Health Sciences, she also worked in a medical surgical unit, the hematology/oncology unit and in labour and delivery. She also volunteers for the Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Canada, which connects her with doctors throughout Canada.

What do you do?

I specialize in advanced care for endometriosis—a disorder that involves the ovaries, fallopian tubes and the tissue lining your pelvis—and minimally invasive surgery.

This role enables me to provide comprehensive guidance for patients from the beginning of their care until they are discharged. I’m a liaison between patients and doctors, which means I coordinate an individualized approach for each patient. I’m grateful to advocate for patients and address their specific needs in their healthcare journey.

I specialize in advanced care for endometriosis and minimally invasive surgery.

What do you love most about your job?

I love my team and am very proud to be a part of it. Working with highly sought physicians who take great pride in keeping themselves at the highest standard is a privilege. They deliver exceptional care.

I have been described as an extension of each of the physicians and I embrace this level of respect and camaraderie. In this role, I cherish the opportunity to listen and act on our patients’ health care concerns.

Who inspires you?

I am inspired by both my grandmothers who are not with me anymore but remain in my everyday thoughts. They taught me about hard work, how to love family and friends, and how to be aware of the needs of the people around you.

I hope to continue to improve women’s health by facilitating and communicating the advancements in gynecological care.

Both of them remembered things that may seem insignificant to some but they knew how to help a person feel important, validated and comforted. I try to bring that mentality to my work every day. There are no patient concerns that are too small or too great.

What do you hope to accomplish while at HHS?

I hope to continue to improve women’s health by facilitating and communicating the advancements in gynecological care.

Each day is different and has new challenges, which I embrace. I like to contribute to new pathways for patients to explore.

Ultimately, I want to look back on my career and see that I gave someone a voice, clarity and comfort during a difficult time.

I love having the opportunity to help others and to be part of something bigger than me. Guiding a person who faces challenging situations is a privilege and seeing them through the process to meet their goal is a cherished component of this role.